Ask!   Submit   Archives and Library related fun!

twitter.com/tammiyk:

    everylibrary:

Help! We really need some money… EveryLibrary needs to raise $40,000 to support our work on our first 10 campaigns of 2014. We are looking for $10,000 in personal donations from our friends, like you. We are also out working hard on corporate donations to fund the rest. Last year, for every dollar you donated we helped secure $1,450 in stable tax money at the ballot box. That means $10 can help us secure $14, 500 in 2014. Every little bit helps. Donate today.

    everylibrary:

    Help! We really need some money… EveryLibrary needs to raise $40,000 to support our work on our first 10 campaigns of 2014. We are looking for $10,000 in personal donations from our friends, like you. We are also out working hard on corporate donations to fund the rest. Last year, for every dollar you donated we helped secure $1,450 in stable tax money at the ballot box. That means $10 can help us secure $14, 500 in 2014. Every little bit helps. Donate today.

    (via thepinakes)

    — 6 months ago with 56 notes
    #everylibrary  #libraries are cool  #libraries  #library 
    digitalpubliclibraryofamerica:

NCCU’s NAACP “works hand-in-hand with other civil rights groups in the city of Durham to end public racial discrimination and to campaign for the constitutional rights of all persons.” From North Carolina Central University’s 1964 The Eagle yearbook (page 122). 
In honor of Black History Month, we’re highlighting images from the yearbooks of historically black colleges and universities in North Carolina. 
North Carolina Central University was founded in 1909 as the “National Religious Training School and Chautauqua for the Colored Race” by Dr. James Edward Shepard. It became the first public liberal arts institution for African Americans in the nation. NCCU’s Master of Information Science program is the only ALA-accredited school in a historically black college and university.
Image credit:North Carolina Central University Archives, James E. Shepard Memorial Library. North Carolina Digital Heritage Center.

    digitalpubliclibraryofamerica:

    NCCU’s NAACP “works hand-in-hand with other civil rights groups in the city of Durham to end public racial discrimination and to campaign for the constitutional rights of all persons.” From North Carolina Central University’s 1964 The Eagle yearbook (page 122). 

    In honor of Black History Month, we’re highlighting images from the yearbooks of historically black colleges and universities in North Carolina. 

    North Carolina Central University was founded in 1909 as the “National Religious Training School and Chautauqua for the Colored Race” by Dr. James Edward Shepard. It became the first public liberal arts institution for African Americans in the nation. NCCU’s Master of Information Science program is the only ALA-accredited school in a historically black college and university.

    Image credit:
    North Carolina Central University Archives, James E. Shepard Memorial Library. North Carolina Digital Heritage Center.

    — 7 months ago with 22 notes
    #naacp  #archives  #dpla 
    "I could process you on the item level all night long."
    Some of these Archival Valentines are just a bit PG-13… (via todaysdocument)

    (via todaysdocument)

    — 7 months ago with 82 notes
    #amazing  #archival valentines  #item level  #archives  #nara 
    "Baby, next to you, everyone else is ephemera."
    Another Archival Valentines submission - this one from one of our NARA colleagues. (via todaysdocument)

    (via todaysdocument)

    — 7 months ago with 182 notes
    #archives  #happy valentine's day  #archival valentines 
    southwestcollectionarchives:

All week we’ve been talking NFL football what with the Super Bowl looming this weekend. The artifacts we’ve been posting are not the only way the SWC has been able to preserve the stories of the NFL and its players. Over the past 60 years, historians at Texas Tech have conducted over 6,000 oral history interviews found both here and here (and of course by visiting the SWC, where boxes upon boxes like those seen above await the attention of eager researchers.) Some of the earliest interviews in our holdings date from the late 1940s. One conducted a little later was with retired running back Duane Thomas. From 1970 to 1974 he toted the rock for the Dallas Cowboys, San Diego Chargers, and Washington Redskins. Much of the interview concerns his thoughts about being an African American professional football player both in the NFL and at West Texas State University (now West Texas A&M) in Canyon, TX.
Learn a little more about our NFL stuff, if you’re interested.

    southwestcollectionarchives:

    All week we’ve been talking NFL football what with the Super Bowl looming this weekend. The artifacts we’ve been posting are not the only way the SWC has been able to preserve the stories of the NFL and its players. Over the past 60 years, historians at Texas Tech have conducted over 6,000 oral history interviews found both here and here (and of course by visiting the SWC, where boxes upon boxes like those seen above await the attention of eager researchers.) Some of the earliest interviews in our holdings date from the late 1940s. One conducted a little later was with retired running back Duane Thomas. From 1970 to 1974 he toted the rock for the Dallas Cowboys, San Diego Chargers, and Washington Redskins. Much of the interview concerns his thoughts about being an African American professional football player both in the NFL and at West Texas State University (now West Texas A&M) in Canyon, TX.

    Learn a little more about our NFL stuff, if you’re interested.

    (via awesomearchives)

    — 7 months ago with 15 notes
    #super bowl  #archives  #nfl  #southwest archives  #texas tech 
    congresscenters:

Archiving 101:  Arrangement & Description by Marc Levitt
Continuing this series as an introduction to the archival field, our hypothetical records have been appraised and acquired, and now reside in the archives. The next step is to begin the arrangement of these records: organizing them with the ultimate goal of making them accessible to future researchers. Often the first step is to create a preliminary inventoryof the records which is usually a basic listing of the boxes and the types of records they contain. This process allows archivists to begin to assert intellectual control over the collection–another way of saying “we know what we have and where it’s at.”
Two important archival principle come into play at this stage: provenance and original order.Provenance (or respect des fonds–a French way of saying the same) states simply that collections are organized by their creator–records aren’t mixed in and among collections, even if they have similar records. For example, we have Senator Robert C. Byrd’s Papers and the Friends of Robert C. Byrd PAC Papers. Even though both contain records pertaining to the Senator, they were created by distinct entities (the Senator himself and the PAC, respectively), and thus remain separated.
Original order is also a fundamental guideline that states archivists keep records in the order in which the creators organized them. This preserves how the creating entity (be it a person or an office) ran their daily activities and can facilitate inferences made from how the records are organized (about relationships and context). As a bonus, adhering to original order also lightens archivists’ workloads so we don’t have to create an arrangement scheme out of thin air–the work has been done for us by the record creators.
Read the rest of the post at the Robert C. Byrd Center for Legislative Studies.

    congresscenters:

    Archiving 101:  Arrangement & Description by Marc Levitt

    Continuing this series as an introduction to the archival field, our hypothetical records have been appraised and acquired, and now reside in the archives. The next step is to begin the arrangement of these records: organizing them with the ultimate goal of making them accessible to future researchers. Often the first step is to create a preliminary inventoryof the records which is usually a basic listing of the boxes and the types of records they contain. This process allows archivists to begin to assert intellectual control over the collection–another way of saying “we know what we have and where it’s at.”

    Two important archival principle come into play at this stage: provenance and original order.Provenance (or respect des fonds–a French way of saying the same) states simply that collections are organized by their creator–records aren’t mixed in and among collections, even if they have similar records. For example, we have Senator Robert C. Byrd’s Papers and the Friends of Robert C. Byrd PAC Papers. Even though both contain records pertaining to the Senator, they were created by distinct entities (the Senator himself and the PAC, respectively), and thus remain separated.

    Original order is also a fundamental guideline that states archivists keep records in the order in which the creators organized them. This preserves how the creating entity (be it a person or an office) ran their daily activities and can facilitate inferences made from how the records are organized (about relationships and context). As a bonus, adhering to original order also lightens archivists’ workloads so we don’t have to create an arrangement scheme out of thin air–the work has been done for us by the record creators.

    Read the rest of the post at the Robert C. Byrd Center for Legislative Studies.

    — 8 months ago with 4 notes
    #respect des fonds  #archives  #archives are cool  #da fonz  #congress  #byrd center 
    archivistsnotes:

Mystery collection seems processed, before 2008.
via W&M Swem Library on Flickr

    archivistsnotes:

    Mystery collection seems processed, before 2008.

    via W&M Swem Library on Flickr

    — 8 months ago with 4 notes
    #archives  #mystery boxes 

    smithsonianavarchivists:

    Excited to see this beautiful new animated video, a fanciful take on what it’s like to do research at the Archives of American Art. It’s a real switch in tone from a promotional film called “For the Record,” produced for the Archives by the Jam Handy organization around 1960.

    (via awesomearchives)

    — 9 months ago with 161 notes
    #archives are cool  #archives of american art 
    thepinakes:

Institute for Research Design in Librarianship
The William H. Hannon Library at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles has launched a new joint venture, the Institute for Research Design in Librarianship. “Novice researchers” are encouraged to apply for a 9-day residency (June 16-24, 2014) to design a research project intended to be implemented during the following year. The institute is funded by a grant from IMLS and cosponsored by SCELC and the SJSU School of Library and Information Science.
From the Call for Proposals:

We are now issuing a call for application for the IRDL 2014. We are seeking 21 novice librarian researchers who are employed by academic libraries or research libraries outside an academic setting in the United States to participate in the institute. We define novice researchers as those who may have conducted research but have not yet had an article published or a presentation accepted by a peer-reviewed publication or conference; librarians who have presented peer-reviewed poster sessions will be eligible. Librarians of all levels of professional experience are welcome to apply.
We seek librarians with a passion for research and a desire to improve their research skills. The project is designed to bring together all that the literature tells us about the necessary conditions for librarians to conduct valid and reliable research in an institutional setting. The cohort will be chosen from a selective submission process, with an emphasis on enthusiasm for research and diversity from a variety of perspectives, including ethnicity and type and size of library.

So…this sounds amazing. I’m not available during the residency period, but if you are, this could be a huge opportunity. Tumblarians, go get it.
EDIT TO ADD: IT IS FREE. ALL COSTS: TRAVEL, LODGING, ETC ARE COVERED.

    thepinakes:

    Institute for Research Design in Librarianship

    The William H. Hannon Library at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles has launched a new joint venture, the Institute for Research Design in Librarianship. “Novice researchers” are encouraged to apply for a 9-day residency (June 16-24, 2014) to design a research project intended to be implemented during the following year. The institute is funded by a grant from IMLS and cosponsored by SCELC and the SJSU School of Library and Information Science.

    From the Call for Proposals:

    We are now issuing a call for application for the IRDL 2014. We are seeking 21 novice librarian researchers who are employed by academic libraries or research libraries outside an academic setting in the United States to participate in the institute. We define novice researchers as those who may have conducted research but have not yet had an article published or a presentation accepted by a peer-reviewed publication or conference; librarians who have presented peer-reviewed poster sessions will be eligible. Librarians of all levels of professional experience are welcome to apply.

    We seek librarians with a passion for research and a desire to improve their research skills. The project is designed to bring together all that the literature tells us about the necessary conditions for librarians to conduct valid and reliable research in an institutional setting. The cohort will be chosen from a selective submission process, with an emphasis on enthusiasm for research and diversity from a variety of perspectives, including ethnicity and type and size of library.

    So…this sounds amazing. I’m not available during the residency period, but if you are, this could be a huge opportunity. Tumblarians, go get it.

    EDIT TO ADD: IT IS FREE. ALL COSTS: TRAVEL, LODGING, ETC ARE COVERED.

    — 9 months ago with 20 notes
    #librarians rock  #loyola marymount university  #irdl 2014 
    ransomcenter:

Fashion designer Austin Scarlett examines the green curtain dress from “Gone With The Wind.” #gwtw #gonewiththewind #austinscarlett #projectrunway (at Harry Ransom Center (HRC))

    ransomcenter:

    Fashion designer Austin Scarlett examines the green curtain dress from “Gone With The Wind.” #gwtw #gonewiththewind #austinscarlett #projectrunway (at Harry Ransom Center (HRC))

    — 10 months ago with 33 notes
    #austin scarlett  #gone with the wind  #harry ransom center  #archives